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FACULTY

Kristi L. Lewton, PhD

FACULTY PROFILE

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biokinesiology

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Kristi Lewton is an adjunct assistant professor of biokinesiology, an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences in Dornsife College, and holds a primary appointment as assistant professor of Clinical Integrative Anatomical Sciences in the Keck School of Medicine. Trained as a biological anthropologist and evolutionary anatomist, her research focuses on the evolution of locomotor systems. Dr. Lewton studies the anatomy and biomechanics of human and non-human primate hindlimb skeletons to understand the evolution of these structures, integrating both comparative morphometric and experimental approaches.

EDUCATION

Postdoctoral Preceptor, Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 2010-2013
Doctor of Philosophy, Anthropology, Arizona State University, 2010
Master of Arts, Anthropology, Arizona State University, 2004
Bachelor of Arts, Anthropology, University of Washington, 2002

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS
  • Lewton KL, Ritzman T, Copes LE, Garland T Jr, Capellini TD. 2019. Exercise-induced loading increases ilium cortical area in a selectively bred mouse model. American Journal of Physical Anthropology168(3):543-551. DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.23770
  • Lewton KL and Scott JE. 2017. Ischial form as an indicator of bipedal kinematics in early hominins: a test using extant anthropoids. Anatomical Record300(5):845-858. DOI: 10.1002/ar.23543
  • Warrener AG, Lewton KL, Pontzer H, Lieberman DE. 2015. A wider pelvis does not increase locomotor cost in humans, with implications for the evolution of childbirth. PLOS ONE 10(3): e0118903.DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0118903
  • Morgan ME, Lewton KL, Kelley J , Otárola-Castillo E, Barry JC, Flynn LJ, Pilbeam DR. 2015. A partial hominoid innominate from the Miocene of Pakistan: description and preliminary analyses. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 112(1):82-87. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1420275111