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FACULTY

Nina S. Bradley, PhD, PT

FACULTY PROFILE

Associate Professor

MAILING ADDRESS

1540 Alcazar St., CHP 155,
Los Angeles, CA 90089-9006

PROFESSIONAL INTERESTS

Dr. Nina S. Bradley’s research and teaching interests focus on motor control, with an emphasis on developmental aspects of sensorimotor physiology, neuro-biomechanical interactions and skills acquisition.

EDUCATION

Post-Doctoral Fellow, Developmental Psychobiology, University of Colorado-Boulder, 1986-1988
Doctor of Philosophy, Kinesiology, University of California, Los Angeles, 1986
Master of Science, Kinesiology, University of California, Los Angeles, 1983
Bachelor of Science Physical Therapy, University of Southern California, 1975

See Nina Bradley’s curriculum vitae.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS
  • Funke, R., Fitter, N.T., de Armendi, J.T., Bradley, N.S., Sargent, B., Matarić, M.J., Smith, B.A. (2019, In press) “A Data Collection of Infants’ Visual, Physical, and Behavioral Reactions to a Small Humanoid Robot.” 2018 IEEE Workshop on Advanced Robotics and its Social Impacts. Genoa, Italy.
  • Sun, S., Baker, L.L., Bradley, N.S. (2018) “Ankle Muscle Tenotomy Does Not Alter Ankle Flexor Muscle Recruitment Bias During Locomotor-related Repetitive Limb Movement in Late-stage Chick Embryos.” Developmental Psychobiology : 60: 150-164. DOI: 10.1002/dev.21594.
  • Sun, S., Bradley, N.S. (2017) “Differences in Flexor and Extensor Activity During Locomotor-Related Leg Movements in Chick Embryos.” Developmental Psychobiology 59:357–366, DOI:10.1002/dev.21500.
  • Porterfield, Finley, Sindhurakar, Bradley, N.S. (2015) “Drift during overground locomotion in newly hatched chicks varies with light exposure during embryogenesis.” Developmental Psychobiology 57:459-469,doi:10.1002/dev.21306.
  • Bradley, N.S., Ryu,Y.U., Yeseta, M.C. (2014) “Spontaneous Locomotor Activity in Late-Stage Chicken Embryos Is Modified by Stretch of Leg Muscles.” Journal of Experimental Biology, 217:896-907. doi:10.1242/jeb.093567.
  • Sindhurakar, A., Bradley, N.S. (2012) “Light Accelerates Morphogenesis and Acquisition of Interlimb Stepping in Chick Embryos.” PLoS ONE7(12): e51348. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0051348.
  • Sindhurakar, A., Bradley, N.S. (2010) “Kinematic Analysis of Overground Locomotion in Chicks Incubated Under Different Light Conditions.” Developmental Psychobiology 52:802-812, 2010.
  •  Ryu YU, Bradley, NS. “Precocious locomotor behavior begins in the egg: development of leg muscle patterns for stepping in the chick”, PLoS ONE 4(7): e6111. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0006111, 2009.
  • Bradley NS, Ryu YU, Lin J. “Fast locomotor burst generation in late stage embryonic motility.” Journal of Neurophysiology 99:1733 – 1742, 2008.
  • Bradley NS, Westcott SL: “Developmental aspects of motor control in skill acquisition.” In: Physical Therapy for Children. A Comprehensive Reference for Pediatric Practice, 3rd Edition. Campbell S (Ed), WB Saunders, Philadelphia, 2006.
  • Oztop E, Bradley NS, Arbib M. “The development of grasping and the mirror system.” In: From Action To Language: Arbib M (Ed) Cambridge Press, 2006.
  • Bradley NS, Solanki D, Zhao D: “Limb movements during embryonic development in the chick: Evidence for a continuum in limb motor control antecedent to locomotion.” Journal of Neurophysiology, 94:4401-4411, 2005.
  • Oztop E, Bradley NS, Arbib MA. “Infant grasp learning: A computational model.” Experimental Brain Research 158:480-503, 2004.
  • Bradley NS, Jahng DY. “Selective Effects of Light Exposure on Distribution of Motility in the Chick Embryo at E18.”
    Journal of Neurophysiology 90:1408-1417, 2003.
  • Bradley NS. Editorial focus: “Connecting the dots between animal and human studies of locomotion.” Journal of Neurophysiology 90:2088-2089, 2003.
  • Bradley NS. “Age-related changes and condition-dependent modifications in distribution of limb movements during embryonic motility.” Journal of Neurophysiology 86: 1511-1522, 2001.
  • Bradley NS, Sebelski C. “Ankle restraint alters motility at E12 in chick embryos.” Journal of Neurophysiology 83:431-440, 2000.
  • Bradley NS. “Developmental aspects of motor control in skill acquisition.” In: Physical Therapy for Children. A Comprehensive Reference for Pediatric Practice, 2nd Edition. Campbell S (Ed), WB Saunders, Philadelphia, pages 45-87, 2000.
  • Bradley NS. “Transformations in embryonic motility in chick: kinematic correlates of type I and II motility at E9 and E12,” Journal of Neurophysiology 81:1486-1494, 1999.
  • Herman SI, Bradley NS. “Interlimb differences in postural responses during symmetric and asymmetric stance.” Neurology Report 23:44-51, 1999.
  • Bradley NS. “Reduction in buoyancy alters parameters of motility in E9 chick embryos,” Physiology & Behavior 62:591-595, 1997.
  • Chambers SH, Bradley NS, Orosz MD. “A kinematic study of intra- and interlimb coordination during motility in chick at 9 embryonic days of age.” Experimental Brain Research 103:218-226, 1995.
  • Bradley NS. “Developmental aspects of motor control in skill acquisition.” In: Physical Therapy for Children. A Comprehensive Reference for Pediatric Practice. Campbell S (Ed), WB Saunders, Philadelphia, pages 39-77, 1994.
  • Orosz MD, Bradley NS, Chambers SH. “Correcting two-dimensional kinematic errors for chick embryonic movements in ovo.” Computers in Biology and Medicine 24:305-314, 1994.
  • Bradley NS, Bekoff A. “Development of coordinated movement in chicks: II. Temporal analysis of hindlimb muscle synergies in embryos with spinal gap transections at embryonic day 10.” Journal of Neurobiology 23: 420-432, 1992.
  • Bradley NS. “What are the principles of motor development?” Medicine and Sport Science 36: 41-49, 1992.
  • Bradley NS, Bekoff A. “Development of coordinated movement in chicks: I. Temporal analysis of hindlimb muscle synergies at embryonic days 9 and 10.” Developmental Psychobiology 23: 763-782, 1990.
  • Bradley NS. “Animal models offer the opportunity to acquire a new perspective on motor development.” Physical Therapy 70: 776-787, 1990.
  • Bradley NS, Bekoff A. “Development of locomotion: animal models. In: The Development of Posture and Gait Across the Lifespan.” Woollacott M, Shumway-Cook A (Eds), University of South Carolina Press, Columbia, pages 48 to 73.
  • Bradley NS, Smith JL. “Neuromuscular patterns of stereotypic hindlimb behaviors the first two postnatal months: I. Stepping in normal kittens.” Developmental Brain Research 38: 37-52, 1988.
  • Bradley NS, Smith JL. “Neuromuscular patterns of stereotypic hindlimb behaviors the first two postnatal months: II. Stepping in spinal kittens.” Developmental Brain Research 38: 53-67, 1988.
  • Bradley NS, Smith JL. “Neuromuscular patterns of stereotypic hindlimb behaviors the first two postnatal months: III. The scratch reflex and paw shake response in kittens.” Developmental Brain Research 38: 69-82, 1988.
  • Thelen E, Bradley NS. “Motor development: posture and locomotion.” In: Handbook of Human Growth and Developmental Biology, Vol. 1. Timaras P, Meisami E (Eds), CRC Press, Boca Raton, pages 221 to 236, 1988.
  • Smith JL, Bradley NS, Carter MC, Giuliani CA, Hoy MG, Koshland GF, Zernicke RF. “Rhythmical movements of the hindlimbs in spinal cat: considerations for a controlling network.” In: Development and Plasticity of the Mammalian Spinal Cord. Goldberger M, Gorio A, Murray M (Eds), Liviana Press, Padova, pages 347 to 361, 1986.
  • Bradley NS, Smith JL. “Early onset of hindlimb paw-shake responses in spinal kittens: new perspective in motor development.” Developmental Brain Research 17: 301-303, 1985.
  • Bradley NS, Smith JL, Villablanca JR. “Absence of hind limb tactile placing in spinal cats and kittens.” Experimental Neurology 82: 73-88, 1983.