Low Back Pain

  • Muscle-Specific Strengthening Effectiveness Post Lumbar Microdiscectomy (MUSSEL)

    Dr. Kornelia Kulig addressed muscle-specific strength training effectiveness post lumbar microdiscectomy. Up to 33% of the adult work force is affected by low back pain each year. It is the number one reason for missed work days and restricted-activity days. Unlike other orthopedic disorders, the expenses associated with management of back pain have increased over the last 20 to 30 years. Because of the frequency of this injury, surgeons have sought ways to minimize the operative trauma. Microdiscectomy is often the procedure of choice for single level injuries in younger adults, as it has been shown to have a high level of success. A certain percentage of persons develop back pain after one to three years past surgery. With the intention of preventing that recurrence of back problems, a post-surgical rehabilitation was implemented. Dr. Kulig’s team evaluated the ability of muscle specific strengthening to result in 1) immediate improvement in function, 2) quality of life, 3) pain and disability reduction, as well as long-term effects on these same outcomes and immediate improvement in muscle performance as assessed by muscle activation.

    For more information, contact:
    Kornelia Kulig, PhD, PT, FAPTA
    Professor
    (323) 442-2911
    kulig@usc.edu

    Visit our website at http://pt2.usc.edu/clinresnet/

    Trunk Coordination in Low Back Pain

    This study is funded by the Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association. It investigates alterations in trunk motion and trunk muscle activity during walking and turning in people with recurrent low back pain. 
    If you have had episodes of low back pain for more than one year and have periods between episodes when you do not have any pain then you may be eligible to participate. The study requires a single visit to the Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Research Laboratory at the University of Southern California. Qualified subjects will be compensated for their time. 

    For more information, contact: 
    Jo Armour Smith 
    (323) 442-2089 
    joannesm@usc.edu 

    Sponsor: American Physical Therapy Association 

    HS Protocol # 11-00667